Tag Archives: extension

Kale Banana Smoothie

kale banana smoothie

Sipping a refreshing kale banana smoothie on my back porch

csa-week-3I just received a third box of food from my farmer, Pekarek’s Produce. Here’s a photo of what I got this week.

I’ll be sharing throughout the week what I’m making. My first recipe is a refreshing Kale Banana Smoothie. My husband and I liked it so well  I plan to make all the rest of my kale into smoothie cubes for quick smoothies in the future. Following is my recipe for Kale Banana Smoothie.

Kale Banana Smoothie

  • Servings: 1 large or 2 small
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup skim milk
  • 1 cup nonfat vanilla Greek yogurt
  • 1 large kale leaf, torn into pieces and without thick pieces of the rib (about 1/2 cup)
  • 1 ripe banana
  • Approximately 4 to 6 cubes (smaller ice cubes work better)

Directions

  1. Add milk, then yogurt to blender.
  2. Next, toss in the kale.
  3. Break banana into chunks and add to mixture.
  4. Place the ice cubes on top. NOTE: If you’ve never made a smoothie with ice in your blender, check your blender instruction book or look for your manual online on the manufacturer’s website to determine if there are specific guidelines for adding ice to your blender. Some blenders may not be strong enough to break down ice cubes.
  5. Begin blending, starting out on a lower speed and then increasing speed. Puree until smooth.
  6. Enjoy immediately.

Alice’s tips:

  • Place liquids in a blender first. It makes it easier to start the blending process.
  • To facilitate the mixing process, start at a lower speed and work your way to a higher speed as the bigger pieces get broken up. 

Source: Recipe created by Alice Henneman, MS, RDN, University of Nebraska–Lincoln Extension Educator. For more recipes and tips for fast, healthy and delicious foods, visit cookitquick.org

Related link:

Cooking Local Foods – Week 1

 

csa-week-1.png

It’s that time of year again when fresh-from-the-farm foods are available at Farmers’ Markets and through CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) shares.*

For most of the weeks from now until the end of September, I’ll share with you tips and recipes for preparing fresh, locally grown foods. Also, I’ll help you avoid wasting fresh fruits and vegetables through storage and freezing tips, plus give recipe suggestions that help you use every last leaf, stalk, ear, etc.! I’ll be using foods currently in season in Nebraska and provided in a CSA share courtesy of Pekarek’s Produce. 

Here’s how I’m using some of the produce from this week (shown in the top photo) in a salad. I will post more ideas and tips as I continue to enjoy my CSA share.

Last night, as an accompaniment to a pasta meal, I prepared a quick salad, using a technique learned on a recent trip to Spain. Here’s what I did:

  1. I washed and dried the lettuce in a salad spinner (helps remove the water and make salad dressing stick better, plus you can use less dressing AND add fewer calories). Also, I sliced a few of the red radishes.
  2. Each person at the table (last night, it was my husband and me) got a salad bowl with the lettuce and radishes.
  3. Next, each of us added a splash of vinegar followed by a couple of splashes of extra virgin olive oil. Use a ratio of about 1 part vinegar (such as balsamic, sherry, red wine or a fruit-flavored vinegar) to 3 parts olive oil. Eyeball it at about 1 teaspoon vinegar to 3 teaspoons olive oil per about 2 cups of salad. (NOTE: If desired, add a dash of salt at the beginning).
  4. Toss and enjoy!

The benefit of this easy recipe is you control the amount of ingredients plus you don’t have any of those aging bottles of salad dressing in your refrigerator that eventually get tossed! And … you don’t have to mix up a salad dressing in advance. Pretty cool!

If you’d like to take just a little more time and include a few more ingredients, prepare a salad dressing for the total salad using these steps for making an olive oil salad dressing.

Making your own salad dressing


 

*Community Supported Agriculture consists of a community of individuals who pledge support to a farm operation so that the farmland becomes, either legally or spiritually, the community’s farm, with the growers and consumers providing mutual support and sharing the risks and benefits of food production. Typically, members or “share-holders” of the farm or garden pledge in advance to cover the anticipated costs of the farm operation and farmer’s salary. In return, they receive shares in the farm’s bounty throughout the growing season, as well as satisfaction gained from reconnecting to the land and participating directly in food production.  Source: USDA National Agricultural Library

How Long Can You Store Commercially Canned Food?

Image courtesy of USDA Image Library

Image courtesy of USDA Image Library

Commercially canned foods are convenient as they require no refrigeration to keep their contents safe. Their nutritional value is comparable to other forms of food such as frozen and fresh. In some cases, it may be higher.

The question that people often our Nebraska Extension office, is “how long can you keep canned food”? This article on “Shelf-Stable” Food Safety,” from the U.S. Department of Agriculture answers this question and more. For example:

  • Is it safe to use rusted cans?
  • Is it safe to use food from dented cans?
  • Is it safe to use cans that freeze accidentally?

So … the next time you wonder if you “can” use the food from that can, check out Shelf-Stable” Food Safety!

Versatile Coleslaw

slaw-final

This recipe will help you make half your plate fruits and vegetables. Cabbage can be steamed, baked, or stuffed, as well as eaten raw.
Makes: 6 servings (approximately 1 cup, each)

Ingredients

  • 6 cups cabbage (shredded)
  • 1 carrot (cleaned, peeled, and shredded)
  • 2 tablespoons light mayonnaise
  • 1/2 cup cider vinegar (or white vinegar)
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon mustard (or dry mustard seed)
  • 2 teaspoons celery seed (if you like)
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt (optional)

Directions

  1. Place the shredded cabbage and carrots in a large bowl.
  2. In a separate bowl add mayonnaise, vinegar, sugar, mustard, and salt. If using celery seed, add that too.
  3. Mix the cabbage and carrots well with the dressing.
  4. Chill in the refrigerator for at least 1 hour before serving.

Source: Available at www.usda.gov/whatscooking and adapted from food.com

Alice’s Notes: This is a very basic coleslaw recipe that can be made from ingredients you probably already have in your kitchen, especially the dressing ingredients. Possible alternative purchased salad dressings include: classic coleslaw dressing, ranch dressing and poppy seed dressing. Other ingredients you could add include:

  • Sliced or diced apples
  • Mandarin oranges
  • Diced green pepper
  • Raisins or dried cranberries
  • Green onions
  • Sunflower seeds
  • Peanuts
  • Pineapple

 

Secrets of Success when Cooking with 5 Ingredients

5-Ingredient Waldorf Salad (link to download the recipe)

5-Ingredient Waldorf Salad (link to download the recipe)

Five seems to be the magic number for the number of ingredients we want in a recipe. This excludes such common ingredients as salt, pepper and water. While researching recipes for a workshop on 5-ingredient cooking, I found the recipes I chose had at least one of the following qualities. See if these criteria help you find quick, easy, tasty recipes too!

  1. Use the best-tasting ingredients whenever possible. It’s hard to hide a poor quality ingredient when there are only five of them. For example, freshly ground black pepper tastes much better than pre-ground.
  2. Try to include at least one high intense flavor ingredient. Examples include:
    • Mustard (consider Dijon)
    • “Sharp” cheeses (you can use less because the flavor is more potent)
    • Lemon juice or lemon zest
    • Onions, garlic, celery
    • Olives
    • Capers
    • Vinegar
    • Nuts
    • Pickle relish
  3. Use some pre-prepared foods that can take the place of several ingredients. Compare the labels on the various brands and varieties as the sodium level can vary significantly. Examples include:
    • Salsa
    • Sauces: spaghetti, pizza, marinara, enchilada
    • Commercial salad dressings (flavorful, lower-fat varieties)
    • Low-fat granola
    • Pie dough, graham cracker crust, pizza dough
  4. Consider seasoning blends. Examples include:
    • Italian seasoning
    • Salt-free blends – sample in the smallest container-size the first time.
  5. Keep on hand ingredients that can be used several ways. Some of my favorites are:
    • Vanilla and plain Greek Yogurt
    • Diced tomatoes (no-added-salt)
    • Canned beans (no-added salt)
  6. Refrigerate some mixed foods (like dips) at least an hour, to allow flavors to blend.
  7. Roast meats and vegetables until “caramelized” or browned. This brings out the flavor.
  8. Thickening a soup without making a white sauce:
    • Remove some of the soup solids and liquid and puree in a blender. Cooking Light magazine (March 2003) warns when blending hot liquids to use caution because steam can increase the pressure inside the blender and blow the lid off. They advise filling the blender no more than half full and blending in batches, if necessary. And, while blending, hold a potholder or towel over the lid.
    • Sprinkle on some instant mashed potato flakes at the end and stir. Add more until you get the consistency you want.

Crushed Red Potatoes

smashed-potatoes-final

The first thing that attracted me to this recipe was the name and the fact I didn’t  have to peel the potatoes! Plus, while the potatoes were boiling, I could gather the other ingredients and clean up my preparation dishes and utensils.

Potatoes have gotten a bad rep as being “fattening” – however as you
can see from the nutritional information, potatoes can make a delicious side dish that is reasonable in calories, low in cholesterol and high in potassium.

Recipe courtesy of United States Potato Board at http://www.potatogoodness.com

Yield: 8 servings
Prep Time: 15 Minutes
Ready Time: 30 Minutes
Cook Time: 15 Minutes

The combination of reduced-fat sour cream and olive oil might seem unusual but it yields a delicious taste and texture in these crushed potatoes.

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds red potatoes, scrubbed and halved or quartered if large
  • 1/2 cup reduced-fat sour cream
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped shallots (see my note at end)
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley
  • 3 tablespoons low-fat milk
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • Salt & freshly ground pepper to taste

Preparation

  1. Cook potatoes in a large saucepan of boiling salted water until tender, 10 to 15 minutes.
  2. Meanwhile, combine sour cream, shallots, parsley, milk, oil, salt and pepper in a small bowl. Stir until smooth and set aside.
  3. Drain the potatoes and crush — but do not completely mash — potatoes with a potato masher or the back of a large spoon. Stir in the sour-cream mixture. Adjust seasonings with salt and pepper.

Nutrition Facts: Calories: 122 Fat: 4g Cholesterol: 6mg Sodium: 54mg Vitamin C: 19.8% Fiber: 2g Protein: 3g Potassium: 562mg

Alice’s Notes:

  • If you want slightly creamier potatoes, slowly stir in extra milk at the end until desired consistency.
  • I substituted 2 tablespoons of chopped sweet onion for the shallots.

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Microwave Omelets and Scrambled Eggs

Omelet Mmade in a Microwave

Omelet Made in a Microwave

My omelets end up looking like scrambled eggs. So … I was very pleasantly surprised when I tried this recipe for “Microwave Mexican Omelet” from the American Egg Board. It takes 1 minute to prepare and 2-1/2 minutes to cook.You cook it in a pie plate.

Definitely a keeper! Check the American Egg Board website for the recipe.

I’ve always liked eggs — they’re an inexpensive source of high quality protein and a source of Vitamin D and choline. Plus, they weigh in at only 70 calories per egg.

After my successful experience making an omelet in the microwave, I decided to try a recipe for scrambled eggs. As the photo shows, these turn out great, also. Plus, they take just a few minutes to make. This is now my go-to method for scrambling eggs for myself. Use this American Egg Board recipe for Basic Microwave Scrambled Eggs.

Scrambled Eggs Made in the Microwave

Scrambled Eggs Made in the Microwave

Fresh Fruit and Veggie Recipes and Tips

Fruit and Veggie Tips and Recipes

Five co-workers and I are all providing fresh-tasting recipes and tips from July through October in our newsletters and blogs. For those of you on Pinterest, we have created a Fresh Fruits and Recipes Board where you can repin your favorites to your own boards. Here’s a glimpse of some of the things we are pinning (NOTE: You may need to read this article online to see this sample of our Pinterest Board).

Check out my friends’ blogs at:

  • Nutrition Know How
    Practical tips from 4 women  and moms who know nutrition!
  • Discover Foods
    Midwest foods with a southern flair from a food scientist / foodie

20-Minute Chicken Creole

cooking

This blog was created by guest blogger, Maggie Spieker, a dietetic student at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Are you looking for something to spice up your weekday meals? Then this easy one pot recipe is for you. Inspired by down home Louisiana Cajun cooking, this chicken creole will not disappoint on flavor. The spiciness level is easily adjusted to fit any taste.

The chicken in this recipe provides lean protein, while the vegetables are loaded with antioxidants. It can easily be made gluten free by putting it on a bed of brown rice instead of whole wheat pasta. You probably have most of the ingredients you will need for this 20-Minute Chicken Creole already in your kitchen.

ingredients

Yield: 8 servings
Cooking time: 20 minutes
Total time:  20 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 2 chicken breast (whole, skinless, boneless)
  • 1 can diced tomatoes (14 1/2 oz., with juice)
  • 1 cup chili sauce (low sodium)
  • 1 green pepper (chopped, large)
  • 2 celery stalk (chopped)
  • 1 onion (chopped, small)
  • 2 garlic clove (minced)
  • 1 teaspoon dried basil
  • 1 teaspoon parsley (dried)
  • 1⁄4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1⁄4 teaspoon salt

Instructions:

  1. Heat pan over medium-high heat (350 degrees in an electric skillet). Add vegetable oil and chicken and cook until no longer pink when cut (3-5 minutes).
  2. Reduce heat to medium (300 degrees in electric skillet).
  3. Add tomatoes with juice, chili sauce, green pepper, celery, onion, garlic, basil, parsley, cayenne pepper, and salt.
  4. Bring to a boil; reduce heat to low and simmer, covered for 10-15 minutes.
  5. Serve over hot, cooked rice or whole wheat pasta.
  6. Refrigerate leftovers within 2 hours.

Photo Gallery

vegetables

These ingredients add color, flavor, and nutrients to this dish

Using whole grain pasta adds fiber

Using whole grain pasta adds fiber

final

Enjoy!!

Recipe Source: Oregon State University Cooperative Extension Service

 

Banana Kale Smoothie

Try a Banana Kale Smoothie - tastes minty and refreshing!

Try a Banana Kale Smoothie – tastes minty and refreshing!

I always thought green smoothies were something other people drank!

Then, bringing home a big bundle of kale from the Farmers Market, I decided to experiment. Here’s the recipe I developed. I think it tastes refreshing and minty. And … I’m now drinking green smoothies!

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup skim milk
  • 1 cup nonfat vanilla Greek yogurt
  • 1 large kale leaf, torn into pieces and without thick pieces of the rib (about 1/2 cup)
  • 1 ripe banana
  • Approximately 4 to 6 cubes (smaller ice cubes work better)

Directions:

  1. Add milk, then yogurt to blender.
  2. Next, toss in the kale.
  3. Break banana into chunks and add to mixture.
  4. Place the ice cubes on top. NOTE: If you’ve never made a smoothie with ice in your blender, check your blender instruction book or look for your manual online on the manufacturer’s website to determine if there are specific guidelines for adding ice to your blender. Some blenders may not be strong enough to break down ice cubes.
  5. Begin blending, starting out on a lower speed and then increasing speed. Puree until smooth.
  6. Enjoy immediately.

Makes 1 very large or 2 medium smoothies.

Tips:

  1. Place liquids in a blender first. It makes it easier to start the blending process.
  2. To facilitate the mixing process, start at a lower speed and work your way to a higher speed as the bigger pieces get broken up.

Another Tip: Don’t even tell people it’s high in calcium, potassium, vitamins A & C to name just a few nutrients!