Tag Archives: salad

Cabbage, Tomato and Corn Salad

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Cabbage, Tomato and Corn Salad (Photo by Alice Henneman)

Cabbage, Tomato and Corn Salad is a recipe inspiration that came to me when I looked at the foods in this week’s Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) box from my farmer, Pekarek’s Produce that included these foods. Though this recipe makes 4 side-salad servings, my husband and I liked it so well, we ate the whole thing for lunch.(These foods would also be currently growing in gardens and available at farmers markets.)

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Cooking Local Seasonal Foods – Week 2

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What my farmer brought me in my Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) share this week.

Follow along as I show you what I made with these local, seasonal foods I received from my farmer this week:

  • Radish
  • Tomatoes
  • Small green onions
  • Radish
  • Cucumber
  • Kohlrabi
  • Lettuce
  • Sugar snap peas

Radish Mouse

Radish Mouse

radish-mouse

Directions

These little creatures are a whimsical way to eat radishes. Cut the tip off the stem end and you have a white nose. Cut a very thin slice from the bottom to help stabilize the mice; proceed to cut the slice in half for the ears. Make a small notch in the radishes near the nose and insert the ears.

TIP: The ears can fall off rather easily. I placed a spoon in the dip so any displaced ears ended up on plates instead of in the dip bowl. Added benefit: People can double-dip from their plate!

Source: Recipe developed by Alice Henneman, MS, RND

Relishes with Onion Yogurt Dip

Make a quick dip by mixing 1 part mayonnaise to 3 parts Greek-style yogurt (for example, I used 1/3 cup mayonnaise and 1 cup yogurt). Mix in some finely sliced green onion. Since the onions were small, I added two of them. A bit of the stem served as a garnish for the dip.

I like using yogurt in dips as it adds extra calcium and protein to snacks. Let the dip refrigerate at least one hour so the flavors can blend. This dip was mixed the night before I used it and made the perfect accompaniment to the kohlrabi, cucumbers and radishes.

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Tuna and Lettuce Salad

I tossed lettuce, tomatoes, radish, cucumbers and kohlrabi with an oil and vinegar salad dressing. Tuna mixed with mayonnaise and chopped green onion topped the salad.

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Egg Salad Sandwiches

For the perfect hard-boiled eggs for my sandwiches, I used these directions for Classic Hard-Boiled Eggs from the American Egg Board. Since there are just two of us in our household, I usually buy only a 6-pack of eggs at a time. If you’re wondering how long to keep eggs, check out Cracking the Date Code on Egg Cartons.

I chopped the eggs, mixed them with some mayonnaise and thinly sliced one of the green onions into the mixture. Served on toasted whole grain bread with a bit of the lettuce, this was the perfect light sandwich for a noon meal.

TIP: Hard-boil extra eggs when cooking eggs for this recipe. Hard-boiled eggs in the shell can be refrigerated up to one week; store in a clean container, not the original carton.

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Tomato Topped with Egg Salad

Remember those extra eggs I recommended hard-boiling? I made some more egg salad and served a scoop of it on a tomato on a plate lined with lettuce. Tuna salad also makes a good topper for tomatoes.

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Pasta Salad with Fresh Veggies and Eggs

Here’s another way I used some of the eggs I hard-boiled earlier during the week. Cook pasta according to package directions. Use about 2 ounces of dry pasta per person, which equals about 1 cup cooked pasta. The amount need not be exact … if you don’t have a kitchen scale, check the total ounces of pasta in the package and and use proportionally an amount equal to two ounces. For example, if there are 16 ounces of dry pasta, you would need 4 ounces for two people or about 4/16 or 1/4 of the total amount of pasta in the box.

Run cooked pasta under cold water to stop the cooking process.

Next, I mixed the pasta with all the remaining veggies from my CSA share (radish, kohlrabi and cucumber) and some cubed cheese together with an oil and vinegar type salad dressing. I chopped two eggs for my husband and me into wedges, saving the best-looking wedges to place on top of the salad. The rest were mixed in with the salad.

Refrigerating the salad (covered with some plastic wrap) for about an hour before serving helped meld the flavors.

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Foods in my CSA share are courtesy of Pekarek’s Produce. 

Salad in a Jar

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Foods received in my Week 1 CSA box

“Salad in a Jar” seemed perfect for my second recipe this year using local, seasonal foods. My first share of foods for the summer in a CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) box from a local farmer included the cauliflower, radish and lettuce used in this recipe.

Local, seasonal fruits and vegetables are at the peak of freshness when purchased either directly from a farm, at a farmers’ market or in a grocery store. Or harvested from your garden.

In my first post, I gave a recipe for a simple lettuce and radish salad dressed with olive oil and vinegar. So none of these fresh, tasty foods goes to waste, I made two Salads in a Jar to enjoy at work this Thursday and Friday.

These salads are so easy to make! You don’t have to use all the ingredients; however, it is very important to put the salad dressing on the bottom followed with a layer of hard, moisture-resistant vegetables to protect the remaining layers from getting soggy.

My salad includes:

  • Salad dressing (I used a vinaigrette)
  • Chopped cauliflower
  • Sliced radishes
  • Black beans (as a source of protein)
  • Shredded cheese
  • Lettuce

Here are the basic ingredients …

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Versatile Coleslaw

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This recipe will help you make half your plate fruits and vegetables. Cabbage can be steamed, baked, or stuffed, as well as eaten raw.
Makes: 6 servings (approximately 1 cup, each)

Ingredients

  • 6 cups cabbage (shredded)
  • 1 carrot (cleaned, peeled, and shredded)
  • 2 tablespoons light mayonnaise
  • 1/2 cup cider vinegar (or white vinegar)
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon mustard (or dry mustard seed)
  • 2 teaspoons celery seed (if you like)
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt (optional)

Directions

  1. Place the shredded cabbage and carrots in a large bowl.
  2. In a separate bowl add mayonnaise, vinegar, sugar, mustard, and salt. If using celery seed, add that too.
  3. Mix the cabbage and carrots well with the dressing.
  4. Chill in the refrigerator for at least 1 hour before serving.

Source: Available at www.usda.gov/whatscooking and adapted from food.com

Alice’s Notes: This is a very basic coleslaw recipe that can be made from ingredients you probably already have in your kitchen, especially the dressing ingredients. Possible alternative purchased salad dressings include: classic coleslaw dressing, ranch dressing and poppy seed dressing. Other ingredients you could add include:

  • Sliced or diced apples
  • Mandarin oranges
  • Diced green pepper
  • Raisins or dried cranberries
  • Green onions
  • Sunflower seeds
  • Peanuts
  • Pineapple

 

Secrets of Success when Cooking with 5 Ingredients

5-Ingredient Waldorf Salad (link to download the recipe)

5-Ingredient Waldorf Salad (link to download the recipe)

Five seems to be the magic number for the number of ingredients we want in a recipe. This excludes such common ingredients as salt, pepper and water. While researching recipes for a workshop on 5-ingredient cooking, I found the recipes I chose had at least one of the following qualities. See if these criteria help you find quick, easy, tasty recipes too!

  1. Use the best-tasting ingredients whenever possible. It’s hard to hide a poor quality ingredient when there are only five of them. For example, freshly ground black pepper tastes much better than pre-ground.
  2. Try to include at least one high intense flavor ingredient. Examples include:
    • Mustard (consider Dijon)
    • “Sharp” cheeses (you can use less because the flavor is more potent)
    • Lemon juice or lemon zest
    • Onions, garlic, celery
    • Olives
    • Capers
    • Vinegar
    • Nuts
    • Pickle relish
  3. Use some pre-prepared foods that can take the place of several ingredients. Compare the labels on the various brands and varieties as the sodium level can vary significantly. Examples include:
    • Salsa
    • Sauces: spaghetti, pizza, marinara, enchilada
    • Commercial salad dressings (flavorful, lower-fat varieties)
    • Low-fat granola
    • Pie dough, graham cracker crust, pizza dough
  4. Consider seasoning blends. Examples include:
    • Italian seasoning
    • Salt-free blends – sample in the smallest container-size the first time.
  5. Keep on hand ingredients that can be used several ways. Some of my favorites are:
    • Vanilla and plain Greek Yogurt
    • Diced tomatoes (no-added-salt)
    • Canned beans (no-added salt)
  6. Refrigerate some mixed foods (like dips) at least an hour, to allow flavors to blend.
  7. Roast meats and vegetables until “caramelized” or browned. This brings out the flavor.
  8. Thickening a soup without making a white sauce:
    • Remove some of the soup solids and liquid and puree in a blender. Cooking Light magazine (March 2003) warns when blending hot liquids to use caution because steam can increase the pressure inside the blender and blow the lid off. They advise filling the blender no more than half full and blending in batches, if necessary. And, while blending, hold a potholder or towel over the lid.
    • Sprinkle on some instant mashed potato flakes at the end and stir. Add more until you get the consistency you want.

Spinach and Strawberry Salad

Dietetic student Beth Menhusen and I taped this video (our first!) of how to make a Spinach and Strawberry Salad. Then, we ate it! We hope you enjoy!

Check out more of what Beth is doing on her blog: bethtalksnutrition.weebly.com

 

 

 

Quinoa Salad

Quinoa Salad

Apple Quinoa Salad

I was looking for an easy side dish recipe I could prepare ahead … and that was sorta unique. I asked my friend and registered dietitian, Janet Bissex, one of the Meal Makeover Moms, if she had a recipe I might share.

Janice suggested an Apple Quinoa Salad recipe. Quinoa is a South American plant that is grown for its seeds. Though not a true cereal grain by definition, quinoa is prepared and used in ways similar to grain. Quinoa provides all nine essential amino acids, making it a complete protein source. It is also gluten-free.

Merriam-Webster online dictionary gives two possible pronunciations for quinoa: (kēn-ˌwä) or (kē-ˈnō-ə). The way it is most commonly pronounced is the first example and sounds like KEEN-wah.

Apple Quinoa Salad is filled lots of good stuff — apples, walnuts, dried cranberries and cheese. Except for the quinoa and maple syrup, the ingredients were ones I already had in my house. (After checking the Cook’s Thesaurus website, I substituted honey for the two tablespoons of maple syrup. I wouldn’t have tried this substitution for a larger amount as maple syrup has a truly unique flavor.)

(TIP: Here’s an easy way to toast walnuts for this recipe from the California Walnut Board.)

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Apple Quinoa Salad ingredients

The thing I liked best about the recipe — it tastes good! My husband gives the salad a “thumbs up!”

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Apple Quinoa Salad gets a thumbs up from my husband!

Get the Recipe!

Download a copy of the Apple Quinoa Salad recipe from the Meal Makeover Moms (Janice Bissex and Liz Weiss) website. And, find four more recipes made with quinoa!